IAHSA Board Chair, Margie Van Zyl, Offers a Reflection

2015 Photo_MargieVanZylby Margie Van Zyl

And so another year is drawing to a close – time to pause, and reflect. In order to embrace the new we must release the old. Just as a trapeze artist cannot swing from one bar to the next without letting go, an important part of our reflection should be to review that past year and release it, learn from it and then look forward to the new season. As you mull over the past year, here are some questions to ask yourself that might be helpful.

What did I learn?

What would I have done differently?

What did I complete or release?

What still feels incomplete to me?

What did I do right?

What were my biggest challenges or roadblocks?

How am I different this year than last year?

What do I need to do more of?

What must I stop doing?

So when we look back, we remember, we learn. So….how was your year? And where do you want to go in the next one?

In my personal reflection the word “gratitude” is foremost in my mind. Our world has been broken this past year in a turbulent economic and volatile political climate. The world has been enveloped with sadness with thousands upon thousands of people being displaced, mass murders, and terror attacks. And yet through all that, my life has remained secure and blessed.

We–each one of us on this call–indeed have much to be grateful for. However, there is much to do. The Hebrew saying tikkun olam says that the world has been broken into pieces. Yes, we’ve seen that this year…and it’s everyone’s job to play their part in putting the pieces back together again, and to help repair the world and make [it] a better place.

My gratitude extends to each one of you for the role you have played in IAHSA, and it is my hope that IAHSA will continue to be a light in the dark world as we reach out to service providers and, through our support to them, help in some small way and play an active role in repairing our world in the small corners where we can. This is our calling, to improve the lives of older people.

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